Saturday, 23 June 2018

Parents want HPV vaccine banned after it wrecked health of their daughters!

Parents want HPV vaccine banned after it wrecked health of their daughters image
A group of American mothers wants the HPV vaccine Gardasil banned after it ruined the health of their teenage daughters
A group of American mothers wants the HPV vaccine Gardasil banned after it ruined the health of their teenage daughters. The 'safe' vaccine - supposed to protect against cervical cancer - has harmed thousands of girls and a small number have died directly after having the shot. The girls have suffered a range of serious side effects, from seizures, strokes, auto-immune disorders, chronic fatigue, hair loss, headaches, heart pain, weak muscles, vision and hearing loss and paralysis. Marian Greene, whose daughter was affected by Gardasil, has set up a website - http://www.truthaboutgardasil.org - where other mothers can document the side effects suffered by their daughters. One of the mothers, who sits on the group's board, ha said her own daughter died after being given the vaccine. Merck, Gardasil's manufacturer, maintains it is safe and effective. Since the US's drug regulator, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), approved the vaccine in 2006, around 40 million doses have been administered to teenage girls around the world. Merck now wants to vaccinate teenage boys as well - while Truth About Gardasil wants it banned. (Source: The Truth About Gardasil; http://www.truthaboutgardasil.org)

https://www.wddty.com/news/

Click Here For More Articles

Don't forget to opt-in to Our Healthy Living Society and get 3 free gifts while receiving the latest information on health, well-being and groundbreaking news about natural nutrition.

Wake Up! Workout! Look hot! Kick Ass!



Click Here For More Articles

Don't forget to opt-in to Our Healthy Living Society and get 3 free gifts while receiving the latest information on health, well-being and groundbreaking news about natural nutrition.

Friday, 22 June 2018

Any exercise is better than no exercise!



Click Here For More Articles

Don't forget to opt-in to Our Healthy Living Society and get 3 free gifts while receiving the latest information on health, well-being and groundbreaking news about natural nutrition.

Eating healthy with Jill Joseph!


Calories are the fuel athletes use to power their bodies, similar to putting gasoline in a car.
Good calories can propel athletes to compete at optimal levels; consuming bad calories is like putting low-octane gas in a high-octane vehicle. The performance will be impaired.
Jill Joseph, the sports nutritionist at Penn Athletics, provides nutritional education and individual counselling to more than 900 student-athletes across 33 teams, helping players fuel and recover, and ensuring that they are healthy and able to play. 
On any given day, she can be found giving individual counselling sessions, doing team talks, or assisting freshmen in devising an eating and training schedule. She serves athletes with medical nutritional needs, creates nutritional plans for athletes returning from injury, and instructs athletes on how to buy healthy groceries and cook healthy meals. She also gives tours showing how to eat healthy in dining halls and works with coaches on travel meals, locker room snacks, halftime fueling, and hydration protocols.
Joseph joined Penn in September 2016 from the University of Louisville, where she served as the assistant director of performance nutrition. She says her interest in nutrition was only a hobby until she attended graduate school at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where she received her master’s degree in nutrition in 2011.   
“Athletes demand so much of their bodies and they’re working so much, training three, four hours a day,” she says. “I just became really interested in the additional nutrition that they would need to be able to support that kind of work.”
Penn Today sat down with Joseph in her office inside Franklin Field to talk good and bad nutrition, eating healthy while in college and away for the summer, foods athletes should avoid, vegan living, and general nutrition advice for all.
Why is nutrition important for athletes?
Number one, for any athlete, their energy needs are so much higher than the average person—their mineral and vitamin needs are so much higher, just based on the amount of work that we’re asking their bodies to do every day. We really have to be conscious that they’re doing X amount more work than the average person, so they need X amount more of all of these types of things, calories, minerals, vitamins, proteins, et cetera. 
What are the effects of bad nutrition? 
We see a lot of energy deficits. For example, in the second half of the game, they just run out of steam. Your body stores energy fairly efficiently, but if somebody is playing a lot of minutes at a high intensity, they can run through those stores of energy pretty quickly and, coming up on the second half, you can see energy just tank. 
College students are not necessarily known for healthy eating. How do you help them eat healthy when they have so many unhealthy options? 
It helps that we have, I believe, good options available in the dining halls. [Student-athletes] can mix and match, and make a different meal almost every single day for the whole school year, if they really tried. But we do have the food carts and the different restaurants that are close by, and it’s difficult.
In terms of trying to navigate students to the healthy choices, I do feel that I try my best to make baby steps. If they’re eating out 10 meals a week, whether it’s lunch or dinner if we could just reduce the number of those because the reality is they’re not going to eat what a dietician would eat every meal. But if we can make small changes, then hopefully they feel how those changes make their bodies operate in a better way, and then, hopefully, that’s when we start to get some of that buy-in. Freshman year is largely regulated by their dining plans. I think a sophomore year is really the trickiest because they’re out on their own, they may not have a dining plan, and so that’s our hardest group to work with. 
Do different sports and athletes have different nutrition plans? 
They’re pretty unique. Some of the field sports may get clumped together, like lacrosse, and soccer, and, to a little lesser extent, field hockey—those sports where they’re covering a lot of distance and they’re doing really high-intensity work with very short breaks. They might run downfield and then they’ll stop for a matter of seconds, and then they’ll change direction and they’ll go somewhere else. Those types of sports I sort of have in one category. And then it even gets more complicated within those sports because you have different positions. The needs are different for a goalie versus a midfielder. The basketball players are high-intensity work. They’re going up and down the court the whole time. Their mileage isn’t as high, but they are sprinting, largely, for most of the game. And then you have other sports, like gymnastics. They really have unique needs because when they’re competing, they do an event with moderate- to high-intensity output for a couple minutes, and then they take a break for a little while.
While I do kind of group some of them together, each sport is unique in some way. Swimming and diving, that’s a very high-output sport. Some of those athletes need 4,000 or 5,000 calories a day based on their volume. An offensive lineman is going to be very different than a swimmer, certainly a long-distance swimmer. 
What about sports that have weight, classes? Do you help wrestlers maintain their weight?
I was just working on a meal plan for a wrestler. We have wrestling, we have sprint football, and lightweight crew: all of those are going to be what we call weight-dependent sports. My main role in that is to help them make the weight and be successful at the weight they need to be at, but get there safely and healthily, and not do crash dieting. 
Is there a certain type of food that you advise athletes to avoid completely? 
Fried food. I could say avoid alcohol or avoid soda, but there is a large amount of research out there about fried foods and trans fats and heart disease. Eating grilled chicken fingers versus fried chicken fingers I feel is not that big a concession to have to make. I try to have them avoid the grease and the unhealthy kind of fats in fried food at all costs.
 What advice do you give athletes when they are away for the summer?
If some of them have specific goals and things they want to work on over the summer, I send them meal plans. I’m here all summer, so if they’re living or working in Philly, or if they live in a suburb nearby, they can stop in. Otherwise, I can do things like email and FaceTime. 
Are you strict with your diet? 
Not strict, per se, but I’ve tried different things. I really am a big advocate of–whether you want to call it a diet or a lifestyle–trying different things to see what makes you feel good and feel your best. Most recently, I was a vegan for a couple years because I was really interested in the way that people talked about how it increases your energy, and you just feel kind of cleaner and better. I think it’s fun to do little experiments for yourself. 
Did you notice a difference in your energy when you were a vegan, or how you felt? 
Not energy, per se. It wasn’t like an overnight thing, so it’s hard to say. But I really like in general how it made me feel. I don’t think I changed my weight at all, but I didn’t feel as heavy on the inside. I liked it and I hope to go back to it.
Do you have any general nutrition advice for athletes or non-athletes? 
Don’t eat large meals. That’s one that transcends all, whether you’re trying to lose weight or trying to put on healthy weight. It’s really trying to avoid those large meals based on the hormonal response that follow large meals, an insulin release. Try to stick with small, more frequent meals throughout the day as a way to reduce body fat and stay healthy, no matter who you are, athlete or non-athlete.
https://penntoday.upenn.edu/news/eating-healthy-jill-joseph


Click Here For More Articles

Don't forget to opt-in to Our Healthy Living Society and get 3 free gifts while receiving the latest information on health, well-being and groundbreaking news about natural nutrition.

Home-Made Energy Bars: Healthy And Wholesome!

These bars are chewy, filling and delicious. They’re also packed with protein, fibre and heart-healthy monounsaturated fats. Vegans can also enjoy them, as they contain no animal products, dairy or gluten. Best of all, they are free from refined sugar and sweetened naturally!
Makes 8 bars 

Ingredients

  • 125 uncooked porridge oats (if required, ensure the oats you use is gluten-free)
  • 140g unsalted almonds
  • 16 Medjool dates, with the stones, removed
  • 20g desiccated coconut (unsweetened)
  • 3 tbsp agave syrup or sweetener of choice
  • 1/2 tsp almond or vanilla essence
  • Pinch of salt
  • 120ml water

Method Of Preparation For The Energy Bars:

1. Preheat the oven to 180°C/Gas 4.
2. Process the oats and almonds in a food processor until finely ground and crumbled. Add the dates, coconut, agave (or alternative) syrup, and almond or vanilla essence and salt, then process again.
3. Add the water slowly, while you process the ingredients until a thick, sticky, cohesive batter forms.
4. Spray or grease a 20cm square baking pan and line with baking paper. Spread batter evenly in the pan and press down well with a spatula so that it is firmly packed.
5. Bake in the oven for 20 minutes. Remove the pan and allow to cool.
6. Remove the paper with its contents onto a flat surface, then cut into 8 bars.

The Recipe

This delicious recipe has been extracted from Dr Michelle Braude’s new book on nutrition, The Food Effect. Click here to find out more about the book and follow her on Instagram at @thefoodeffectdr.

Want To Know More?

Our diet affects our energy levels with the wrong type of foods being draining and leaving us feeling lethargic and lazy. When your energy levels drop, you’ll likely grab a meal or a quick snack to give yourself a boost. Unfortunately, choosing the wrongs foods could leave you void of energy and have you feeling tired and lazy.
If you experience that your lethargic state has little to do with lack of sleep and more to do with diet choices, click on the link to find out which foods you should be cutting out.
https://www.longevitylive.com/nutrition-body/home-made-energy-bars-healthy/

Click Here For More Articles

Don't forget to opt-in to Our Healthy Living Society and get 3 free gifts while receiving the latest information on health, well-being and groundbreaking news about natural nutrition.

Thursday, 21 June 2018

Myopia caused by lack of sunlight!

Myopia caused by lack of sunlight image
A lack of sunlight is one of the principal causes of myopia or short-sightedness, a major new review has discovered.
Although 161 genetic factors play a part in causing myopia—now the most common eye problem—the lack of sunlight, especially when we are young, is a significant factor, say researchers at the Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz. "Send your kids to play outside for two hours every day," says lead researcher Norbert Pfeiffer.
Many of the genetic factors identified are involved in the ability to process light, say the researchers who analysed the eye health and genetic make-up of more than 250,000 participants around the world.
Their findings—which quadruples the known number of genetic factors that cause myopia—confirm the current theory that the internal layer of the eye communicates with the router to increase the length of the eye, a critical factor in the development of myopia.
A lack of sunshine can have two elements: the geographical location of a country and social activity that keeps people, and especially young children, indoors for long periods. The rise of myopia is most marked in South-East Asia, even though it is a region that has far more natural sunlight than countries in the northern hemisphere. But the region has also seen a major cultural shift in the past decade, with more children going to school.
Myopia (also known as near-sightedness) is also caused by doing close-up work, such as working on a PC or smartphone, in poorly-lit rooms. The eye adapts to the poor light, and becomes more elongated, but, over time, it can become too elongated, making the cornea and lens focus on an image in front of the retina instead of directly on it, which makes distant objects appear blurry.
https://www.wddty.com/news/2018/06/myopiaClick Here For More Articles

Don't forget to opt-in to Our Healthy Living Society and get 3 free gifts while receiving the latest information on health, well-being and groundbreaking news about natural nutrition.

Tuesday, 19 June 2018

One in three people taking drugs that cause depression and raise suicide risk!

One in three people taking drugs that cause depression and raise suicide risk image
One in three prescription drugs that people take every day can cause depression and increase the risk of suicide—and yet nobody seems to be aware of the dangers, a new study has found.
More than 200 of the most commonly prescribed drugs—ranging from heart medications, painkillers, and indigestion pills—are linked to depression and suicidal ideation (thoughts) as side effects.
This means that one in three people are unwittingly taking a prescription drug that can cause these mental health problems, say researchers from the University of Illinois.
The risk could be greater still as many older people are taking more than one of the drugs at the same time. Depression has affected around 15 per cent of people who were taking three or more of the drugs, 9 per cent of those taking two drugs, and 7 per cent of those taking just one of the drugs.
A similar pattern was seen in the rates of suicide in people taking one or more of the drugs, the researchers discovered when they analysed medication use among more than 26,000 people in the US over a nine-year period to 2014.
Even over-the-counter (OTC) medications that don't need a prescription—such as common painkillers or indigestion aids—can increase the risk of suicide and depression, the researchers warn.
The drugs don't just make the patient feel depressed—they can lead to a clinical diagnosis of depression that may trigger a prescription for antidepressants, says lead researcher Dima Qato.
Prescriptions for the 200 drugs that are linked to depression and suicide increased by 3 per cent in recent years, while the use of antacids for indigestion, such as proton pump inhibitors and H2 antagonists, doubled.
Few of the drugs that can cause depression and suicide don't list the possible side effects, and so neither the prescribing doctor nor the patient is aware of the increased risk.
"People are increasingly using these medications, yet very few of these drugs have warning labels," said Dr Qato.
https://www.wddty.com/news/2018/06

Click Here For More Articles

Don't forget to opt-in to Our Healthy Living Society and get 3 free gifts while receiving the latest information on health, well-being and groundbreaking news about natural nutrition.

Friday, 15 June 2018

The true extent of the UK's excessive drinking!

Boozy blackouts: 2.6 million Britons suffer from memory loss on a weekly basis due to excessive alcohol consumption

Over a third of UK adults drink alcohol four times a week or more


New independent, nationally representative research among more than 2,000 UK adults commissioned by PharmacyOutlet.co.uk has revealed the nation’s unhealthy drinking habits, finding:
  • 35% of UK adults drink alcohol four times a week or more
    • Men (44%) were far more likely to drink this often than women (27%)
  • 5% of Britons (2.59 million people) admitted that, at least once a week, they drink so much alcohol they suffer from memory loss
    • The figure doubles to 10% among 18-34 year olds, and stands at 9% among Londoners
  • 3% of people even said they vomited due to excessive alcohol consumption on a weekly basis
    • Again, this jumps to 8% among millennials and 7% in London
  • Worryingly, a mere 12% of UK adults said they count the number of alcohol units they consume to ensure they do not exceed the recommended limit
  • But 23% of people do not actually know what the recommended levels are

More than 2.5 million people across the UK drink so much alcohol that they suffer from memory loss or are sick on a weekly basis, new research by PharmacyOutlet.co.uk has revealed.

The online pharmacist and EPS specialist commissioned an independent, nationally representative survey among more than 2,000 UK adults. It found that over a third (35%) of UK adults drink alcohol four times a week or more, with men (44%) far more likely to drink this often than women (27%).

The research also found that 5% of UK adults – 2.59 million people – drink so excessively that once a week, on average, they suffer from memory loss. Those aged between 18 and 34 (10%) and people in London (9%) were more likely to experience such regular alcohol-related blackouts.

Furthermore, 3% of the population even said they vomited due to excessive alcohol consumption on a weekly basis. Again, the figure is significantly higher among millennials (8%) and those living in the capital (7%).

PharmacyOutlet.co.uk’s study showed that people’s drinking issues result from a lack of care in monitoring their intake combined with ignorance over what is a safe level of alcohol to consume. The survey found that a mere 12% of UK adults count the number of alcohol units they drink to ensure they do not exceed the recommended limit, while 23% of people do not actually know what the recommended levels are.

Hitesh Dodhia, Superintendent Pharmacist at PharmacyOutlet.co.uk, commented on the findings: “Much is made of the UK’s drinking culture, and this research certainly offers up some concerning results. While drinking little and often can be relatively low risk – as long as it’s within the recommended levels – there are very serious health issues that can potentially arise from regularly drinking to excess.

“Beyond the memory loss and vomiting that binge drinking can trigger in the short-term, alcohol abuse over a longer period can lead to liver damage, cancer and depression. As such, it is vital that people are aware of what the recommended consumption levels are and monitor their intake. What’s more, if they ever feel they have an addiction to alcohol, it is really important that they seek help promptly.”

In 2016 the UK Chief Medical Officers reformed its guidelines to state that both men and women should not drink more than 14 units of alcohol each week – the equivalent of six pints of average-strength beer or the same number of medium-sized glasses of wine. The previous guidelines were 21 units for men and 14 units for women per week.


  Dominic@cityroadcomms.co.uk
 

Click Here For More Articles

Don't forget to opt-in to Our Healthy Living Society and get 3 free gifts while receiving the latest information on health, well-being and groundbreaking news about natural nutrition.

Thursday, 14 June 2018

Chemical industry blocks report on cancer links!

Chemical industry blocks report on cancer links image
A crucial report into the dangers of formaldehyde—found in building materials such as plywood and foam insulation—has been suppressed by the chemical industry. The US's Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has delayed the release of the papers that now links the chemical to leukaemia as well as other cancers.
Top EPA officials have refused to review the study—which means it can't be released to the public—following intensive lobbying by the industry's representative group, the American Chemistry Council (ACC).
Although formaldehyde has been linked to several cancers in the past, the council was especially worried about the latest evidence that it could cause leukaemia, a cancer of the blood.
The news agency, Reuters, that discovered the delay, suspects pressure has also come directly from the business-friendly White House that has previously criticised the EPA for a report on the contamination of public water supplies from chemicals used in the manufacture of Teflon and fire-fighting agents. Again, the EPA blocked the publication of the report after a White House aide said it would have caused "a public relations nightmare."
The EPA has been working on the latest report for eight years after the National Academy of Sciences had criticized it for failing to draw "clear links" between the chemical and leukaemia, although it accepted it could cause nose and throat cancers.
When the EPA presented a draft version of the report last January, the ACC said that the leukaemia connection was "scientifically indefensible".


Click Here For More Articles

Don't forget to opt-in to Our Healthy Living Society and get 3 free gifts while receiving the latest information on health, well-being and groundbreaking news about natural nutrition.

Which type of vitamin B12 is best–cyanocobalamin, methylcobalamin, or hydroxycobalamin?


I have followed you for years and purchase your tapes. Met you in Ann Arbor at the food co- op. Is it true Cyanocobalamin b12 ( which you recommend for us as vegans) turns into cyanide and the best b12 to take is hydroxycobalamin?Per Raymond Francis MIT scientist. That’s what his website shows anyway. His comments were it is man made , not natural, and not well utilized. What is absorbed is turn into cyanide. Could you please clarify, help.
David Tunison / Originally asked on Vegan epidemic

Answer:

Let me guess: Mr. Francis sells hydroxycobalamin supplements?
It’s like the whole coral calcium scam. Calcium is cheap as chalk–in fact it is chalk! So how are you going to bilk people out of lots of money? You sell some sort of special calcium. Same with B12 supplements.
B12 is so cheap to produce that supplement manufacturers try to come up with all sorts of fancy ways to “add value” to products so they can charge $30 a bottle. Unless you’re a smoker, have kidney failure, or base your diet around cassava root, cyanocobalamin should be fine. That’s what I take!
Click Here For More Articles

Don't forget to opt-in to Our Healthy Living Society and get 3 free gifts while receiving the latest information on health, well-being and groundbreaking news about natural nutrition.

Wednesday, 13 June 2018

Face Mapping — The Window To Your Health and Wellbeing!

Guest writer for Wake Up World
Next time you look in the mirror, you may see yourself very differently…
“Face mapping,” a practice that began over 5,000 years ago in China, is now becoming more and more popular among health practitioners to help diagnose, prevent, and cure disease. It works on the principle that imbalances and dysfunctions in your body show up on your face. You just have to know where and how to look.

Your Face Tells the Story of Your Health

I had a patient who had been trying to find the source of her severe headaches and fatigue for 8 months, going from doctor to doctor. By using face mapping, I was able to locate the problem almost immediately. I noticed an indentation and discolouration just under her nose. That zone, which includes the chin, is associated with hormonal health. As it turned out, her health issues were hormonal, which was confirmed by blood tests. I successfully treated her with meditation, acupuncture, and a specialized mixture of herbs from my Tao of Wellness practice.

The Forehead

According to face mapping, the forehead corresponds to the fire element. This is the area associated with the heart and small intestine, as well as the mind and spirit. A blue or green discolouration in the forehead shows an imbalance in the heart. I also look for redness or small blood vessels that appear as discolouration. A heart attack can often be foretold by a subtle bluish-green hue on the forehead.

The Nose

This area is connected to the earth element, which corresponds with the stomach, spleen, and pancreas. A pimple on the side or tip of your nose could have something to do with your diet if it includes a lot of spicy, deep-fried, fatty, or rich foods. It goes deeper than being just a dermatological issue; it could correspond with indigestion, constipation, or diarrhoea.
Broken capillaries or redness across the bridge of the nose could mean you need to monitor your alcohol intake, or it may simply point to excessive worry and stress, which could upset the balance of your earth element network.

The Chin

This zone is related to the water element, which is internally associated with your kidney and bladder organ network, including the hormonal system and glands. This zone also includes your philtrum – the indentation just above your lips. This small area relates to the uterus and ovaries in women and the prostate and genitals in men. Horizontal lines, blemishes, or discolourations across the philtrum could indicate problems with the reproductive organs.

Right Cheek

This is related to the metal element, the zone that reflects the lung and large intestine network. Problems in this network could manifest themselves as discolouration, blemishes, and skin problems on the right check. A mild acne breakout, eczema patch, or slight redness may mean a cold is coming on. Lung illness or upper respiratory ailments also trigger visual symptoms on the right cheek.
Those who are prone to respiratory allergies or asthma tend to have a reddish, scaly eczema, a slight rash or slight bluish-green hue along the right cheek. This shows that there’s too much heat or inflammation in the respiratory system, or a lack of oxygen from bronchial constriction. One of my pediatric patients who suffered from allergic asthma always displayed an eczema-like patch right before an allergic attack—a very useful tip-off!

Left Cheek

The left cheek corresponds to your wood element or the liver-gall-bladder network. Broken capillaries and redness—especially right up next to the bridge of your nose – indicate heat from the liver, inflammation, or congestion. Bulging veins, redness, and rash can be a signal of high blood pressure or pent-up anger (which can cause high blood pressure). Yellowish deposits under the left eye may indicate gallstones or high triglycerides or high cholesterol, which are processed by the liver-gallbladder network.  Since this network includes the nervous system, depression can also show up in the wood-element side of the face.
I believe that by learning about face mapping, you can be proactive about your health. And by staying on top of changes you see in the mirror, you can stay ahead of sickness!

About the author:

Isabelle Clover is a psychologist and writer with a passion for teaching others how to heal their lives through personal growth and development, holistic living, and a focus on health and wellness. She has certifications in medical intuition, Reiki energy healing, and meditation.
For more information, please visit: CLOVER SISTERS.

Click Here For More Articles

Don't forget to opt-in to Our Healthy Living Society and get 3 free gifts while receiving the latest information on health, well-being and groundbreaking news about natural nutrition.