Monday, 30 April 2018

Nondescript they may be, but oats are a true ‘superfood’!

Most people pay little attention to the flakes in their morning muesli (a breakfast and brunch dish), but those oats are a true ‘superfood’. They can lower blood-sugar and cholesterol levels and protect gut flora as well, thereby helping to prevent cancer.
Oats are also very filling, keeping hunger at bay long after breakfast. And they can be used to make hearty dishes and baked goods.
“What’s particularly important in oats is a special kind of dietary fibre: beta-glucans,” says Johannes Gottfried Mayer, head of the research group on monastic medicine at the University of Wuerzburg’s Institute for History of Medicine. “Beta-glucans prevent a large rise in blood-sugar levels, which is especially beneficial for people with Type 2 diabetes.”
Studies have shown that insulin-dependent diabetics can reduce their insulin requirement by a third with a predominantly oat-based diet on just two days a
month. The effects of an ‘oat day’ last two to three weeks, Mayer says.


Studies have shown that insulin-dependent diabetics can reduce their insulin requirement by a third with a predominantly oat-based diet on just two days a month

“What’s more, beta-glucans are thought to bind to bile acids and thereby increase their excretion, making the body draw on cholesterol to produce more bile acid,” she says. This lowers cholesterol levels.
Despite their many health benefits, oats should be eaten in moderation, Pfannebecker advises. “Grain, in general, is relatively high in calories, so you shouldn’t overdo it.”
She says an ideal portion of oatmeal consists of 40 to 50 grammes, which contain roughly 150 to 180 calories. Pfannebecker recommends eating oats with foods containing protein, such as milk, curd cheese or yoghurt. This is even more filling.
“To aid the absorption of the iron contained in oats,” she says, “you should eat them in combination with vitamin C – with fresh fruit or juice, for example.” – Text and Photo by dpa
https://borneobulletin.com.bn/nondescript-they-may-be-but-oats-are-a-true-superfood/

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One on One: Beth L. Rau, of Beth Rau Fitness, turns passion into business!



Beth L. Rau began her encore career as a personal fitness trainer after age 50, inspiring her clients – some in their 60s and 70s – to stay healthy and active regardless of age.
Working out of her home in Fitchburg where she set up an indoor fitness area and also holds training sessions outdoors, Ms. Rau, 53, said she hopes to expand Beth Rau Fitness and add nutrition training to her work with clients.
Running the business — with some help from her daughter, Rebecca, 13, who is a gymnast and sometimes goes over conditioning techniques with her — Ms. Rau’s own personal fitness regimen includes “serious” weightlifting and kickboxing the last three years and also hiking for most of her life. She also plays sports, including soccer and tennis.
The mother of three, ages 13, 15 and 25, and also the grandmother of a 2-year-old, said she is an also graphic designer who started her own graphic design business nearly 20 years ago but said fitness training is also her passion and helps keep in her shape.
Is it difficult running a business in North Central Massachusetts?
“I think it is great. It is a small community. People know each other and they are very community-oriented. I’ve had great clients who have been with me in my graphics business since the beginning. Clients have changed jobs and worked for other companies and took me along with them and I am able to continue my relationship with them through 18 years.”
Why did you decide to become a fitness trainer at 52?
“I was always active and into exercising and it is a passion and big part of life - hiking or doing kickboxing or running or playing recreational sports. It was always a priority to be in good shape, good health and be fit. I was doing my graphic design business for 18 years and it was getting kind of isolating in front of the computer in the office all day long and not having a lot of social interaction. Everything is electronic and done online. I really wanted to do something else to give me a variety of interactions with people. I decided that I was going to use my passion for fitness and started another career. I always wanted to be a personal trainer and decided to finally do it.”
Why did you open in this area?
“I met my husband and moved out here because he is from this area. I knew I didn’t want to make the commute to Boston every day, so I planned to start my own business and started Rau Graphics in 2000. I’ve been doing that ever since. I was familiar with owning a business, interacting with clients and customer satisfaction. That really helped me in this new endeavour.”
What did you have to do before opening?
“The first step was getting my certification as a personal trainer. I took an online course and an exam and also took a CPR course for adult first aid/CPR/AED through American Red Cross. I had done a lot of research on my own and tried a lot of different sports and I had a lot of experience in strength training.”
How did you build your customer base?
“I have a website, bethraufitness.com, and through friends and clients through my graphic design business and I know a lot of people in the community from having my own business. I also reached out to clients and people in various places where I exercised and created a network with. I am also on an online marketplace called findyourtrainer.com that’s a vehicle for personal trainers for potential clients searching profiles.”
How much has your business grown in the last year?
“I started out with four to five clients and now I have 10 to 12 clients. It keeps me busy. I love the personal training and I would love that to be my primary focus, but I can’t see myself giving up graphic design altogether. It is so great to have both. It’s such a good mix because they are two totally different things.”
Do you ever see yourself opening a fitness centre outside your home?
“I like working privately. I might work for a fitness centre eventually, but I can’t see myself doing that solely. I see clients here and travel to people’s homes. I have that flexibility. I do see results and it is so fulfilling and really feel like I am helping people. That is the goal. You can be in the best fitness at any age. Age should not be a factor in leading a healthy, active lifestyle, especially for seniors. It is so important to keep moving. I get such gratification out of helping people feel good and see results. It really makes me feel a big accomplishment. They did the work, but I helped them along the way. I gave them the guidance and it is very fulfilling.”
What is the average age of your clients?
“I have quite a few senior clients age 50-plus. I do have clients in their 60s and 70s. I think they seek me out because of my age. I am close in age to them and I understand the challenges they face in their older years. I’ve heard that they can relate to me better because I am closer in age to them than trainers in their 20s and 30s.
“I feel like I’ve created a little niche here and I like that. I really want to promote that even seniors can live a healthy, active lifestyle. Even if you are sedentary now, you can turn it around and prevent injuries and just feel better physically in your older years.”
Compiled by Paula J. Owen, correspondent
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Expert Emphasizes Healthy Lifestyle in Prostate Cancer Care


Stephen J. Freedland, MD
Stephen J. Freedland, MD
In an era of multidisciplinary care, it is important to incorporate healthcare experts to help encourage patients with cancer to lead a healthy lifestyle, says Stephen J. Freedland, MD.

For patients with prostate cancer, diet and exercise are important, as weight loss can prepare the body for therapy as well as prevent conditions such as heart disease from interfering with treatment. Additionally, weight loss can lead to higher self-esteem, which can help a patient mentally prepare for the adverse events (AEs) of prostate cancer treatment, Freedland adds.

“Work with dietitians and exercise physiologists, because not only are you helping the patient in terms of heart disease or other problems, but you are getting them to a better mental fitness,” Freedland explained. “They will feel better about themselves and be in a better state to tolerate the other treatments, and maybe, we could slow down cancer.”

In an interview during the 2018 OncLive® State of the Science Summit™ on Genitourinary Cancers, Freedland, Warschaw Robertson Law Families Chair in Prostate Cancer, director of the Center for Integrated Research in Cancer and Lifestyle, and co-director of the Cancer Genetics and Prevention Program at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, gave his insight on how to counsel patients with prostate cancer on the benefits of leading a healthier life.

OncLive: Please provide an overview of your presentation.

Freedland: In regard to diet and lifestyle in cancer, there are not a lot of data to support our beliefs. I went through some of the myths and common perceptions that people have and reviewed the data that support or refute what people actually think about diet and prostate cancer.

There is this concept that we need to get rid of fat in the diet. That is certainly one approach, but one of the problems with that is that when you cut fat, you end up eating more sugar, and you might actually do more harm that way. We should be thinking of diet more holistically than just cutting out one thing or another.

Another example is that people are fixated on omega-3 fatty acids and fish oil, but when you actually look at it, there are certain fish like tilapia that have no fish oil at all. In actuality, pork bacon and doughnuts have more fish oil than tilapia, so that is a myth that we can debunk quickly. 

Is diet dependent on the stage of disease? What would you say to a patient who is stage IV as opposed to a patient who is stage II?

It is a good question—do we tailor the diet to where the patient is in their cancer? The challenge is that we don't know, but we try to come up with a diet that they can live with and that they can follow their whole life. Whether they are at risk, in early-stage disease, or even late-stage disease, this should be a diet that is sustainable and can stay with them through the whole treatment. A lot of it is giving up simple sugars and trying to get them to lose weight and exercise. Smoking is correlated to dying from prostate cancer so we are trying to get men to stop smoking. Overall, it is just leading a healthy life with little tips thrown in.

How would you handle a situation where a patient does not want to adhere to a change in diet?

We try to work with the patient. I would say "What is it that you can give up, and what can't you give up?" To me, it is very similar to when we tell a man that his cancer is progressing, and he does not want to undergo treatment because he does not want to deal with the AEs. He knows that he will die from the disease, but he is not willing to have treatment. In my younger years, that stuff used to really upset me.

What I have learned over the years is that patients are allowed to make bad choices. It is not my job to make sure they make a perfect choice every time—it is my job to make sure they are educated, understand their risks, understand the benefits, and have all of the information available to them. Given that, if they still make a choice to eat a certain way, forego a certain treatment, or choose a less aggressive treatment, that is their choice.

How long is the adjustment period for patients beginning a new diet?

In my experience of trying different diets myself and with patients, usually within a couple weeks, we can get to a point where patients start to see the benefits in terms of weight loss and feeling better. The first couple weeks of starting anything new can be a challenge.  
There are support groups out there; Us Too is probably the best known. A lot of hospitals have them, and there are community groups; there are a lot of organizations that do support groups for prostate cancer survivors. For some people, it is beneficial to be a part of a community, but some people are a little more private and do not do as well. There is this perception that those groups tend to attract the people who are less happy and who just want to go there to complain, but most of these groups are there to be supportive and can be helpful. Men tend to take less advantage of these groups than women. We see very strong support groups for women with breast cancer.

What are some key things physicians can share with their patients to try and be healthier?

The whole challenge in terms of diet and lifestyle is that it is very easy to give a quick answer. As most things in life—particularly with medicine—the quick answer is rarely the right answer. What I would say is to first get patients to lose weight, get them to exercise more, and stop smoking. But, quick little suggestions like giving up red meat is not the answer. There are a lot of healthy diets that can incorporate red meat, particularly if it is grain-fed meat, not overcooked, and not processed; it all comes down to more nuanced care.

If you are not comfortable with that discussion, you need to incorporate people into your practice that can help provide complete care to a patient.

https://www.onclive.com/web-exclusives/expert-emphasizes-healthy-lifestyle-in-prostate-cancer-care?p=1

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Saturday, 28 April 2018

Must see video! How this man changed his life 10 years after tumour op!









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Scientists discover a major organ (and it could explain acupuncture)!

Regular WDDTY readers have probably got the message that doctors don't have all the answers, but you'd think they would have accurately mapped out the human body by now. Seemingly not, as researchers have just recently discovered another organ in our body, and an essential one that regulates most of the major diseases—and could even explain why acupuncture works.
The newly-discovered organ, the interstitium, is a body-wide network of interconnected compartments that are filled with fluids that are supported by a meshwork of flexible proteins. It's found just below the skin's surface, and in the lining of our digestive tract, lungs and urinary system, and in surrounding arteries and veins, and in the fascia between muscles.
It seems to act as a shock absorber that stops tissues from tearing while the other organs, muscles and blood vessels go about their necessary functions, say researchers from the New York University School of Medicine, who made the discovery.
As a highway of moving fluid, the interstitium could also act as the channel that allows cancer to spread, they think.
And it could also explain why acupuncture works. The protein bundles within the interstitium generate electricity as they bend with the movements of the surrounding organs and muscles and could play a part in therapies such as acupuncture, the researchers say. The interstitium also seems to be involved in inflammatory processes throughout the body, which have been linked to a range of diseases from heart problems, diabetes, arthritis and some cancers.
Biologists have always missed the interstitium because they have focused on tissues and organs without seeing the spaces between, the researchers say. This is partly down to the way that science examines body tissue by treating samples with chemicals in a process known as fixing—and which drains away any fluid, which, essentially, is what the interstitium is.
https://www.wddty.com/news/2018/04/scientists-discover-a-major-organ-and-it-could-explain-acupuncture.html?
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Friday, 27 April 2018

Dr Joel Fuhrman – THE 3 STEPS TO INCREDIBLE HEALTH




You need salt to prevent disease and get your electric body to run in the most energized way! Incorporate healthy salt into your body to be the best you that you can be! Question EVERYTHING you are told by the controllers. In this world, everything is inverted. Simple truth is... listen to your body!! Be cautious of who you listen to on this subject. If anyone in suit at a conference of any kind is telling you salt is bad... you may want to question it.





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Variety to Training (Change Things Up)!


Sgt. Hector Masso, a Binghamton, New York, native and automation section sergeant with Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, performs weighted squats at the Greywolf Physical Fitness Center Aug. 13 at Fort Hood, Texas. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Brandon Banzhaf, 3rd BCT, 1st Cav. Div.)
Quite often people find a workout they like or remember it working for them in the past and stick to it with good short-term results.  However, if the goal requires to optimally score on competitive selection program PT tests or preparing for more than the test (boot camp, basic, military/police / fire academy) you need to add variety to your training in order to avoid plateaus and continue the positive growth curve.
Hi Stew, I've heard great things about your training program. I've been running and doing a lot of body weight exercises. I have noticed very little changes even though I constantly change my workouts. I just can't seem to make any progress even with a 5 day a week workout program. Any advice would be great. Respectfully, Jake
The above workout week changes the workouts daily and each upper body day - though similar in exercises (pushups, situps, pull-ups, etc) they have completely different choreography that yield better results (PT PyramidSuper SetMax Rep Set PT Progression).
For instance:  Don't do the same old workout every other day (or daily).  Don't do the same run workout every other day (or daily).  These type of workouts might work for a few weeks, but in the long term, you will crash hard with injury or negative results typically.  PT needs more variety to help with growth and EVERY OTHER DAY. DO NOT DO DAILY calisthenics exercises.
People usually start to see plateaus or negative results after daily repetitions of the same exercises back to back to back days. Same with running - if you are doing the same "3-mile loop" every day, you will get good at slow 3 mile runs.  But faster 1.5, 2 or 3-mile timed runs need some speed work to help. The same goes for the exact same workout even if done every OTHER day. Variety is the spice of life - so SPICE it up!
Ideas: Training for timed runs – If you are focusing on training for timed runs, you need to mix in a fast tempo day or two, a goal paced day where you “learn” your goal pace, and maybe a long distance day per week. Build up to 4-6 days of running per week over time and add mileage each week to the tune of about 10-15% each week.   Don’t just jump into a high mile run on week 1 of training.
In the end, look at your recovery.  Are you getting enough rest, eating/hydrating well before, during, after workouts? These are the questions that most people do not consider when thinking about their optimal performance.  But these issues (food, hydration – water/electrolytes, rest, sleep) are critical to optimal performance and continuing a positive growth curve to calisthenics, running, as well as strength training in the weight room.  In fact, you may have the perfect workout programming, but miss out on any of the above recovery elements and you will start to see negative growth or progress plateaus.
About Stew Smith CSCS
Stew Smith is a Navy SEAL Veteran who supports the Tactical Strength and Conditioning program of the National Strength and Conditioning Association and is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS).  He also has over 1000 articles on Military.com Fitness Forum and 100 Podcasts focusing on a variety of fitness, nutritional, and tactical issues military members face throughout their career.

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Thursday, 26 April 2018

Power of Micro-Habits: How 10 Push-Ups A Day Can Change Your Life!

Habits determine who and what we become. They are often subconscious and happen without much consideration. Habits also determine if we are successful in achieving our life goals.
“Successful people are simply those with successful habits” – Brian Tracy


I was first encouraged to re-evaluate my daily habits by a senior executive in early 2017. He suggested that I replace sports talk radio with NPR and television with books. I took his advice and began the process of discovering healthy habits.
As I started reading more frequently, I came across “The Healthy Habit Revolution” by Derek Doepker. The premise of the book is to create micro-habits to make it easier to implement healthy habits into your life.

Start Small

One habit I struggled with was exercising regularly. I took the book’s instruction and began small. I started with 10 push-ups each morning. Slowly my strength grew and could add 10 sit-ups to my morning routine. After push-ups and sit-ups, I started lifting weights at the gym after work. This evolved to going to the gym before work to lift weights and run for 10 minutes. I am currently training for a 5K race in May, all thanks to doing 10 push-ups in the beginning.

Extracurricular Activities

After successfully adding regular exercise to my daily routine, I wanted to continue the positive momentum. My next focus was to add meditation. Before micro-habits, I was mortified by the thought of sitting in one place and BREATHING for extended periods of time. My micro-habit was to set a timer for 2 minutes and meditate. After a few successful sessions at 2 minutes, I graduated to 3, 4 and then 5 minutes. I am currently meditating for 10 minutes with the goal of twenty minutes within the next three months.

Daily Improvement

As time went on, I kept adding healthy habits into my daily routine through the micro-habit concept. I am getting closer to my ideal daily routine that will improve my mind, body and spirit. It constantly amazes me how healthy habits can change your life and lead to other positive impacts throughout your day. I went from 10 push-ups each morning to applying meditation, journaling, prayer, lifting weights, running, reading and playing guitar into my daily routine.
You can share the same results if you stick to it!

P.S.
Another tool that I found helpful in creating healthy habits was the iPhone app HabitHub. The service allows you to input habits that you want to track and it will remind you to complete them in a timely manner. I started with the free version but upgraded so I could add unlimited habits to my track list.
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Overview of Oral Health in Older Adults!




As populations in the United States and around the globe move toward a world in which 25% of people will be 65 years or older, much attention is being paid to the management of chronic diseases and maintenance of activities of daily living. Cardiovascular disease, cancers, Alzheimer disease, and immunologic disorders are among the systemic conditions attracting the attention of researchers, pharmaceutical companies, government agencies, and healthcare professionals.
Often overlooked is the contribution of a healthy mouth to a person’s overall well-being and its relationship with the disease processes occurring in the rest of the body. Yet the effects of poor oral health are similar to other uncontrolled disease processes.
Without a healthy mouth, important aspects of general and health-related quality of life are affected, including nutrition, self-image, willingness to interact socially, mental health, and all too often, physical health. The 32 adult teeth (including the third molars, or the “wisdom” teeth) and associated tissues serve a wide variety of functions in daily life. The mouth, tongue, and throat interface with the external environment, filter and process microbes and antigens, and send signals to the brain about ingested foods and other substances.


The oral cavity is critically important in speech, mastication, swallowing, and digestion of foods as well as to one’s appearance.
1 Deficiencies in any of these functions because of disease or injury can affect a person’s self-image and desire to interact with others, which in turn can lead to social isolation and thereby contribute to depression. In this issue of the What’s Hot newsletter, published by The Gerontological Society of America (GSA), oral health is considered as an essential element of healthy ageing. The topic encompasses the breadth of the human condition, including clinical, scientific, psychosocial, and policy considerations. Normal/Pathological Aging In the ageing process, tooth loss, gum disease, and other dental problems have historically been considered inevitable outcomes. But like many aspects of “normal” ageing, edentulism and poor oral health can be prevented.

The outlook for oral health is changing because of shifts toward new ideas in dentistry, including an integrated preventive approach to care and maintenance of the natural teeth and oral tissues whenever possible. Rather than a norm of extracting teeth, followed by tooth replacement, dental professionals today prefer conservative approaches aimed at preserving teeth, including restorations (e.g., fillings, crowns) and preventive care for older patients with dental caries, gum disease, injuries, or problems such as temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders and other orofacial conditions. Removal of teeth and prosthetic replacement are considered only a last resort.

 By The Gerontological Society of America

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Wednesday, 25 April 2018

Discovery Channel - Moringa Documentary!






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Why choose Ankh Rah high-quality Moringa over other brands?

Why choose Ankh Rah high-quality Moringa over other brands?


Ankh Rah Moringa leaves are specially picked by hand with tender loving care, to produce high-quality Moringa leaf powder.


Get your award-winning high-quality Moringa from www.ankhrah.com.

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Microplastic Contamination Is Found in Most Bottled Water, a New Study Says!

Drinking from a plastic water bottle likely means ingesting microplastic particles, a new study claims, prompting fresh concerns — and calls for scientific research — on the possible health implications of widespread plastics pollution.
A study carried out on more than 250 water bottles sourced from 11 brands in nine different countries revealed that Microplastic contamination was nearly universal, found in more than 90% of the samples.

The study, by journalism organization Orb Media and researchers at the State University of New York at Fredonia, found an average of 10.4 microplastic particles about the width of a human hair per litre. That’s about twice the level of contamination discovered in the group’s earlier study on the ubiquitous plastic contamination in tap water across the globe, with the highest rate found in the U.S.Previous studies have found that a large portion of the microplastic particles found in our oceans, lakes and rivers, as well as in fish stomachs, can be traced back to the washing of synthetic clothes.
In the case of bottled water, Orb’s new study indicated contamination was partly the result of plastic packaging, and partly the fault of the bottling process. The survey included brands like Aquafina, Dasani, Evian, NestlĂ© and San Pellegrino.
It’s unclear what effect, if any, this consumption of tiny bits of plastics has on human health. As much as 90% of ingested plastic could pass through a human body, but some of it may end up lodged in the gut, or travelling through the lymphatic system, according to research by the European Food Safety Authority.
“We don’t know all the chemicals in plastics, even… There are so many unknowns here,” Jane Muncke, chief scientist at the Zurich-based Food Packaging Forum, told Orb.
http://time.com/5200680/microplastic-water-bottle-orb-study/

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Tuesday, 24 April 2018

Shocking Effects Of A Whole Food Plant Based Vegan Diet






















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What I Eat in a Day ( Vegan ) // Lazy Easy Cheap Meals







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Can eating less every day slow the ageing process?


Can eating less every day slow the ageing process? image
Can eating less food every day slow down the ageing process? Reducing your calorie intake by 30 per cent could keep your brain younger and even help you live longer—although so far these benefits have been seen only in animal studies.
The latest tests have been carried out on two grey mouse lemurs: one had a normal diet for nine years and the other was fed a similar balanced diet that had 30 percent fewer calories. The lifespan of the calorie-restricted lemur increased by nearly 50 percent, and its motor capacities remained healthy its whole life, while its brains resembled that of a younger animal.
The researchers from CNRS in France say the theory of calorie-restricted diets and their impact on ageing is still 'controversial' in humans, although similar positive results have been seen in macaques, as well as in mice, flies and worms.
The next stage, say the researchers, is to carry out more animal studies, but next time to gauge the impact on ageing of calorie-restriction with physical exercise.

https://www.wddty.com/news/2018/04/can-eating-less-every-day-slow-the-ageing-process.html?
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Sunday, 22 April 2018

Ingested vs. Contact vs. Inhaled Allergies!



Ingested allergies

food allergy is a type of food intolerance in which a person’s immune system abnormally reacts to food. It’s also known as food hypersensitivity. It’s more common for children to have food allergies than adults. Food allergies are most often caused by:
  • cow’s milk
  • nuts
  • eggs
  • fruit
Symptoms of food allergies can be mild. Such is the case with hives. Hives can appear when certain foods are eaten. Most people with allergies have elevated levels of food-specific immunoglobulin IgE in their bloodstream. These are antibodies that bind to the allergen and then attach to mast cells in the skin. The mast cells in turn release histamine, which triggers a release of fluid that causes red, itchy, and inflamed skin — known as hives.
More severe symptoms of ingested allergies may include:
  • abdominal cramps
  • vomiting
  • diarrhoea
  • skin rash
  • swelling of the lips and eyes which appears and disappears quickly
  • anaphylaxis, a sudden, extreme allergic reaction characterized by difficulty breathing, swelling of the tongue or throat and may result in death
Any food allergy can progress to anaphylaxis, even if previous exposure reactions have been mild.
Children with food allergies may exhibit behavioural signs such as crying, irritability, or milk refusal.
Contact allergies
Contact allergies occur when an allergen touches a person’s skin.
The symptoms of this type of allergy are usually confined to the area of contact with the skin. Common irritants include:
  • soaps
  • detergents
  • hair dyes
  • jewellery
  • solvents
  • waxes
  • polishes
Natural allergens include ragweed.
Though annoying, a contact allergy is rarely dangerous. Symptoms of a contact allergy may include skin:
  • redness
  • itching
  • swelling
  • scaling
  • blistering
The best way to deal with a contact allergy is to identify and avoid the irritant. Treatments may include:
  • creams or ointments to help calm symptoms
  • antihistamines to prevent an allergic reaction
  • an anti-inflammatory medication such as prednisone in the most serious cases
With treatment, contact allergies usually resolve in a few days. But contact your doctor if there’s drainage from a rash accompanied by pain or fever, or if red streaks emanate from the rash. These are all signs of an infection rather than an allergic reaction.
INHALED ALLERGIES

Inhaled allergies

Inhaled allergies are the most common type of allergy. Symptoms may include:
  • sneezing
  • runny nose
  • watery eyes
  • itchy eyes
Many people who have inhaled allergies only experience symptoms during certain seasons. Pollen, grass, and mould are the most common triggers of seasonal allergies.
Pollen is a fine powder that comes from trees, weeds, and grass. Each season, beginning in the spring and continuing through the fall, the amount of pollen in the air increases. This increase may trigger allergic symptoms in people sensitive to pollen.
Avoiding pollen isn’t always as simple as retreating inside during allergy season. Other types of airborne allergens are prevalent indoors. These include:
  • fungi
  • mould
  • pet dander
  • dust mites
Many people confuse hay fever with asthma. Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder that causes bronchial swelling and constriction. It may be triggered by hay fever if a person has both conditions.
But hay fever and asthma are very different. A number of other factors can trigger an asthma attack, including:
  • a respiratory infection
  • certain drugs
  • other types of allergens, such as dust mites or diesel fumes
  • cold air
  • certain emotions and stress
https://www.healthline.com/health/allergies/ingested-contact-inhaled

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