Friday, 30 June 2017

Urban Fitness League wants to make Brooklyn's sport famous



Even doctors don't believe the drug companies. Around 80 per cent say medical research is skewed and can't be trusted, a new survey has found.
Less surprisingly, the public is also distrustful of medical research, and instead relies on the advice of family and friends. Most also want to see simpler package inserts that explain in everyday English the risks of a drug, instead of listing them in "impenetrable" and "unreadable" small print.

In all, 82 per cent of the 1,000 doctors polled said they didn't trust the results of trials that had been paid for by the drug company whose product was being tested, and feared the data had been massaged to achieve a positive result. Around 67 per cent of the 2,000 members of the public who were also polled shared the same concerns.

The UK's Academy of Medical Sciences, which organised the survey, is calling for greater transparency, including clearer labelling and package inserts. But while the drug industry remains the only major sponsor of drug trials, the dangers of biased and manipulated research remain.

The academy's Prof Sir John Tooke, who oversaw the survey, said he was startled by its findings. "Information from research will need to be more accessible and understandable, as well as reliable and trustworthy in the future," he said.

The survey had been commissioned by the UK's chief medical officer of health, Prof Dame Sally Davies, in the wake of controversies over a range of drugs, including statins, HRT (hormone replacement therapy), and Tamiflu.




Even doctors don't believe the drug companies. Around 80 per cent say medical research is skewed and can't be trusted, a new survey has found.
Less surprisingly, the public is also distrustful of medical research, and instead relies on the advice of family and friends. Most also want to see simpler package inserts that explain in everyday English the risks of a drug, instead of listing them in "impenetrable" and "unreadable" small print.

In all, 82 per cent of the 1,000 doctors polled said they didn't trust the results of trials that had been paid for by the drug company whose product was being tested, and feared the data had been massaged to achieve a positive result. Around 67 per cent of the 2,000 members of the public who were also polled shared the same concerns.

The UK's Academy of Medical Sciences, which organised the survey, is calling for greater transparency, including clearer labelling and package inserts. But while the drug industry remains the only major sponsor of drug trials, the dangers of biased and manipulated research remain.

The academy's Prof Sir John Tooke, who oversaw the survey, said he was startled by its findings. "Information from research will need to be more accessible and understandable, as well as reliable and trustworthy in the future," he said.

The survey had been commissioned by the UK's chief medical officer of health, Prof Dame Sally Davies, in the wake of controversies over a range of drugs, including statins, HRT (hormone replacement therapy), and Tamiflu.



Even doctors don't believe the drug companies. Around 80 per cent say medical research is skewed and can't be trusted, a new survey has found.
Less surprisingly, the public is also distrustful of medical research, and instead relies on the advice of family and friends. Most also want to see simpler package inserts that explain in everyday English the risks of a drug, instead of listing them in "impenetrable" and "unreadable" small print.

In all, 82 per cent of the 1,000 doctors polled said they didn't trust the results of trials that had been paid for by the drug company whose product was being tested, and feared the data had been massaged to achieve a positive result. Around 67 per cent of the 2,000 members of the public who were also polled shared the same concerns.

The UK's Academy of Medical Sciences, which organised the survey, is calling for greater transparency, including clearer labelling and package inserts. But while the drug industry remains the only major sponsor of drug trials, the dangers of biased and manipulated research remain.

The academy's Prof Sir John Tooke, who oversaw the survey, said he was startled by its findings. "Information from research will need to be more accessible and understandable, as well as reliable and trustworthy in the future," he said.

The survey had been commissioned by the UK's chief medical officer of health, Prof Dame Sally Davies, in the wake of controversies over a range of drugs, including statins, HRT (hormone replacement therapy), and Tamiflu.



Even doctors don't believe the drug companies. Around 80 per cent say medical research is skewed and can't be trusted, a new survey has found.
Less surprisingly, the public is also distrustful of medical research, and instead relies on the advice of family and friends. Most also want to see simpler package inserts that explain in everyday English the risks of a drug, instead of listing them in "impenetrable" and "unreadable" small print.

In all, 82 per cent of the 1,000 doctors polled said they didn't trust the results of trials that had been paid for by the drug company whose product was being tested, and feared the data had been massaged to achieve a positive result. Around 67 per cent of the 2,000 members of the public who were also polled shared the same concerns.

The UK's Academy of Medical Sciences, which organised the survey, is calling for greater transparency, including clearer labelling and package inserts. But while the drug industry remains the only major sponsor of drug trials, the dangers of biased and manipulated research remain.

The academy's Prof Sir John Tooke, who oversaw the survey, said he was startled by its findings. "Information from research will need to be more accessible and understandable, as well as reliable and trustworthy in the future," he said.

The survey had been commissioned by the UK's chief medical officer of health, Prof Dame Sally Davies, in the wake of controversies over a range of drugs, including statins, HRT (hormone replacement therapy), and Tamiflu.



Even doctors don't believe the drug companies. Around 80 per cent say medical research is skewed and can't be trusted, a new survey has found.
Less surprisingly, the public is also distrustful of medical research, and instead relies on the advice of family and friends. Most also want to see simpler package inserts that explain in everyday English the risks of a drug, instead of listing them in "impenetrable" and "unreadable" small print.

In all, 82 per cent of the 1,000 doctors polled said they didn't trust the results of trials that had been paid for by the drug company whose product was being tested, and feared the data had been massaged to achieve a positive result. Around 67 per cent of the 2,000 members of the public who were also polled shared the same concerns.

The UK's Academy of Medical Sciences, which organised the survey, is calling for greater transparency, including clearer labelling and package inserts. But while the drug industry remains the only major sponsor of drug trials, the dangers of biased and manipulated research remain.

The academy's Prof Sir John Tooke, who oversaw the survey, said he was startled by its findings. "Information from research will need to be more accessible and understandable, as well as reliable and trustworthy in the future," he said.

The survey had been commissioned by the UK's chief medical officer of health, Prof Dame Sally Davies, in the wake of controversies over a range of drugs, including statins, HRT (hormone replacement therapy), and Tamiflu.





Gut problems such as Crohn's disease could be helped, or even reversed, by eating lots of 'good' fats, such as from coconut oil and cocoa butter.

The fats change the bacteria in the gut—known as the microbiome—which reduces some of the distressing symptoms of Crohn's, such as swelling, cramping and diarrhea.

The fats reduce the types of bacteria that are linked to Crohn's by around 30 per cent, researchers from the Case Western Reserve University have discovered. Because the fats lower inflammation, they could have the same beneficial effects on other inflammatory bowel disorders too.

The good fats they tested are plant-based, rather than the saturated fats from animals, the researchers say.

"The finding is remarkable because it means that a Crohn's patient could have a beneficial effect on their gut bacteria and inflammation only by switching the type of fat in their diet. Patients would only need to replace a 'bad' fat with a 'good' fat, and eat normal amounts," said lead researcher Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios.
 Brooklyn has a home-grown sport that’s made it all the way to China and Australia, but hasn’t really become a movement here.
Best known as extreme calisthenics or street workout, neither of those terms does it justice. Think more like breakdancing in the air, somewhere between parkour and Cirque du Soleil.
Men and women use only their body weight and the makeshift uneven bars they find on public jungle gyms, turning their workouts into tests of balance, agility and stamina. Oh, you can do a plank? Try doing it hanging backwards from a bar.
The sport took off thanks to Instagram and YouTube, where stars like Brandon “Beastmode” CorreaSimone “Mingja” MingStephen “Brooklyn Tank” Navaretta and Gina Scarangella have inspired people all over the globe from Europe to Brazil, Australia to China. It’s even been broadcast on EuroSport as “street workout.”
Starting next year, they’ll be organized under the banner of the Urban Fitness League, founded by Ben Sturner, president of the sports startup incubator Leverage Agency.
“I found out about UFL by walking down Union Square and watching this guy doing crazy pull-ups and muscle-ups,” Sturner recalls. “I asked his name; he said it was Abs, and he pulled up his shirt — he had a 16-pack.”
Sturner hired him as his trainer, and this July 4 he’s bringing the first major public exhibition of future UFL athletes to Coney Island. Hosted by Mario Lopez and Tyson Beckford, the exhibition at Ford Amphitheater will feature some of the biggest names in the sport from around the world performing freestyle routines and battles with a halftime show by DJ Envy, Jim Jones, Juelz Santana and more. Tickets start at $10.
“We’re the antithesis of the Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest,” Sturner says, nodding to the usual main event in Coney Island for the Fourth. “In the U.S., there hasn’t been a big organized event like this — this is the Super Bowl of the sport.”
The event, like the sport, will be family oriented. Inclusivity is a cornerstone of the sport, since the only thing you need is your body and a kid-free playground, and athletes will include a performer without legs, a 16-year-old girl and a man who’s 74. “It’s a great thing for families to come to because it’ll be very motivational,” he says. “They’re going to want to come home and try this.”
Sturner is already lining up the starpower behind Urban Fitness League, which will be organized into teams led by sports icons like Red Sox star David Ortiz in Boston and NBA All-Star point guard Stephon Marbury in China. Marbury will also be at Coney Island this weekend, giving out 1,000 pairs of shoes and signing autographs for fans.
Sturner’s vision for the league is to be a “convergence of sport, style and music,” with all the trappings of other professional sports like a draft, and a reality series. But it all starts in Coney Island, so check out the action on the Fourth of July.

Gut problems such as Crohn's disease could be helped, or even reversed, by eating lots of 'good' fats, such as from coconut oil and cocoa butter.

The fats change the bacteria in the gut—known as the microbiome—which reduces some of the distressing symptoms of Crohn's, such as swelling, cramping and diarrhea.

The fats reduce the types of bacteria that are linked to Crohn's by around 30 per cent, researchers from the Case Western Reserve University have discovered. Because the fats lower inflammation, they could have the same beneficial effects on other inflammatory bowel disorders too.

The good fats they tested are plant-based, rather than the saturated fats from animals, the researchers say.

"The finding is remarkable because it means that a Crohn's patient could have a beneficial effect on their gut bacteria and inflammation only by switching the type of fat in their diet. Patients would only need to replace a 'bad' fat with a 'good' fat, and eat normal amounts," said lead researcher Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios.

Gut problems such as Crohn's disease could be helped, or even reversed, by eating lots of 'good' fats, such as from coconut oil and cocoa butter.

The fats change the bacteria in the gut—known as the microbiome—which reduces some of the distressing symptoms of Crohn's, such as swelling, cramping and diarrhea.

The fats reduce the types of bacteria that are linked to Crohn's by around 30 per cent, researchers from the Case Western Reserve University have discovered. Because the fats lower inflammation, they could have the same beneficial effects on other inflammatory bowel disorders too.

The good fats they tested are plant-based, rather than the saturated fats from animals, the researchers say.

"The finding is remarkable because it means that a Crohn's patient could have a beneficial effect on their gut bacteria and inflammation only by switching the type of fat in their diet. Patients would only need to replace a 'bad' fat with a 'good' fat, and eat normal amounts," said lead researcher Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios.

Gut problems such as Crohn's disease could be helped, or even reversed, by eating lots of 'good' fats, such as from coconut oil and cocoa butter.

The fats change the bacteria in the gut—known as the microbiome—which reduces some of the distressing symptoms of Crohn's, such as swelling, cramping and diarrhea.

The fats reduce the types of bacteria that are linked to Crohn's by around 30 per cent, researchers from the Case Western Reserve University have discovered. Because the fats lower inflammation, they could have the same beneficial effects on other inflammatory bowel disorders too.

The good fats they tested are plant-based, rather than the saturated fats from animals, the researchers say.

"The finding is remarkable because it means that a Crohn's patient could have a beneficial effect on their gut bacteria and inflammation only by switching the type of fat in their diet. Patients would only need to replace a 'bad' fat with a 'good' fat, and eat normal amounts," said lead researcher Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios.

Gut problems such as Crohn's disease could be helped, or even reversed, by eating lots of 'good' fats, such as from coconut oil and cocoa butter.

The fats change the bacteria in the gut—known as the microbiome—which reduces some of the distressing symptoms of Crohn's, such as swelling, cramping and diarrhea.

The fats reduce the types of bacteria that are linked to Crohn's by around 30 per cent, researchers from the Case Western Reserve University have discovered. Because the fats lower inflammation, they could have the same beneficial effects on other inflammatory bowel disorders too.

The good fats they tested are plant-based, rather than the saturated fats from animals, the researchers say.

"The finding is remarkable because it means that a Crohn's patient could have a beneficial effect on their gut bacteria and inflammation only by switching the type of fat in their diet. Patients would only need to replace a 'bad' fat with a 'good' fat, and eat normal amounts," said lead researcher Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios.

Gut problems such as Crohn's disease could be helped, or even reversed, by eating lots of 'good' fats, such as from coconut oil and cocoa butter.

The fats change the bacteria in the gut—known as the microbiome—which reduces some of the distressing symptoms of Crohn's, such as swelling, cramping and diarrhea.

The fats reduce the types of bacteria that are linked to Crohn's by around 30 per cent, researchers from the Case Western Reserve University have discovered. Because the fats lower inflammation, they could have the same beneficial effects on other inflammatory bowel disorders too.

The good fats they tested are plant-based, rather than the saturated fats from animals, the researchers say.

"The finding is remarkable because it means that a Crohn's patient could have a beneficial effect on their gut bacteria and inflammation only by switching the type of fat in their diet. Patients would only need to replace a 'bad' fat with a 'good' fat, and eat normal amounts," said lead researcher Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios.

Gut problems such as Crohn's disease could be helped, or even reversed, by eating lots of 'good' fats, such as from coconut oil and cocoa butter.

The fats change the bacteria in the gut—known as the microbiome—which reduces some of the distressing symptoms of Crohn's, such as swelling, cramping and diarrhea.

The fats reduce the types of bacteria that are linked to Crohn's by around 30 per cent, researchers from the Case Western Reserve University have discovered. Because the fats lower inflammation, they could have the same beneficial effects on other inflammatory bowel disorders too.

The good fats they tested are plant-based, rather than the saturated fats from animals, the researchers say.

"The finding is remarkable because it means that a Crohn's patient could have a beneficial effect on their gut bacteria and inflammation only by switching the type of fat in their diet. Patients would only need to replace a 'bad' fat with a 'good' fat, and eat normal amounts," said lead researcher Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios.

Gut problems such as Crohn's disease could be helped, or even reversed, by eating lots of 'good' fats, such as from coconut oil and cocoa butter.

The fats change the bacteria in the gut—known as the microbiome—which reduces some of the distressing symptoms of Crohn's, such as swelling, cramping and diarrhea.

The fats reduce the types of bacteria that are linked to Crohn's by around 30 per cent, researchers from the Case Western Reserve University have discovered. Because the fats lower inflammation, they could have the same beneficial effects on other inflammatory bowel disorders too.

The good fats they tested are plant-based, rather than the saturated fats from animals, the researchers say.

"The finding is remarkable because it means that a Crohn's patient could have a beneficial effect on their gut bacteria and inflammation only by switching the type of fat in their diet. Patients would only need to replace a 'bad' fat with a 'good' fat, and eat normal amounts," said lead researcher Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios.

Gut problems such as Crohn's disease could be helped, or even reversed, by eating lots of 'good' fats, such as from coconut oil and cocoa butter.

The fats change the bacteria in the gut—known as the microbiome—which reduces some of the distressing symptoms of Crohn's, such as swelling, cramping and diarrhea.

The fats reduce the types of bacteria that are linked to Crohn's by around 30 per cent, researchers from the Case Western Reserve University have discovered. Because the fats lower inflammation, they could have the same beneficial effects on other inflammatory bowel disorders too.

The good fats they tested are plant-based, rather than the saturated fats from animals, the researchers say.

"The finding is remarkable because it means that a Crohn's patient could have a beneficial effect on their gut bacteria and inflammation only by switching the type of fat in their diet. Patients would only need to replace a 'bad' fat with a 'good' fat, and eat normal amounts," said lead researcher Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios.

Gut problems such as Crohn's disease could be helped, or even reversed, by eating lots of 'good' fats, such as from coconut oil and cocoa butter.

The fats change the bacteria in the gut—known as the microbiome—which reduces some of the distressing symptoms of Crohn's, such as swelling, cramping and diarrhea.

The fats reduce the types of bacteria that are linked to Crohn's by around 30 per cent, researchers from the Case Western Reserve University have discovered. Because the fats lower inflammation, they could have the same beneficial effects on other inflammatory bowel disorders too.

The good fats they tested are plant-based, rather than the saturated fats from animals, the researchers say.

"The finding is remarkable because it means that a Crohn's patient could have a beneficial effect on their gut bacteria and inflammation only by switching the type of fat in their diet. Patients would only need to replace a 'bad' fat with a 'good' fat, and eat normal amounts," said lead researcher Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios.

Gut problems such as Crohn's disease could be helped, or even reversed, by eating lots of 'good' fats, such as from coconut oil and cocoa butter.

The fats change the bacteria in the gut—known as the microbiome—which reduces some of the distressing symptoms of Crohn's, such as swelling, cramping and diarrhea.

The fats reduce the types of bacteria that are linked to Crohn's by around 30 per cent, researchers from the Case Western Reserve University have discovered. Because the fats lower inflammation, they could have the same beneficial effects on other inflammatory bowel disorders too.

The good fats they tested are plant-based, rather than the saturated fats from animals, the researchers say.

"The finding is remarkable because it means that a Crohn's patient could have a beneficial effect on their gut bacteria and inflammation only by switching the type of fat in their diet. Patients would only need to replace a 'bad' fat with a 'good' fat, and eat normal amounts," said lead researcher Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios.

Gut problems such as Crohn's disease could be helped, or even reversed, by eating lots of 'good' fats, such as from coconut oil and cocoa butter.

The fats change the bacteria in the gut—known as the microbiome—which reduces some of the distressing symptoms of Crohn's, such as swelling, cramping and diarrhea.

The fats reduce the types of bacteria that are linked to Crohn's by around 30 per cent, researchers from the Case Western Reserve University have discovered. Because the fats lower inflammation, they could have the same beneficial effects on other inflammatory bowel disorders too.

The good fats they tested are plant-based, rather than the saturated fats from animals, the researchers say.

"The finding is remarkable because it means that a Crohn's patient could have a beneficial effect on their gut bacteria and inflammation only by switching the type of fat in their diet. Patients would only need to replace a 'bad' fat with a 'good' fat, and eat normal amounts," said lead researcher Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios.

Gut problems such as Crohn's disease could be helped, or even reversed, by eating lots of 'good' fats, such as from coconut oil and cocoa butter.

The fats change the bacteria in the gut—known as the microbiome—which reduces some of the distressing symptoms of Crohn's, such as swelling, cramping and diarrhea.

The fats reduce the types of bacteria that are linked to Crohn's by around 30 per cent, researchers from the Case Western Reserve University have discovered. Because the fats lower inflammation, they could have the same beneficial effects on other inflammatory bowel disorders too.

The good fats they tested are plant-based, rather than the saturated fats from animals, the researchers say.

"The finding is remarkable because it means that a Crohn's patient could have a beneficial effect on their gut bacteria and inflammation only by switching the type of fat in their diet. Patients would only need to replace a 'bad' fat with a 'good' fat, and eat normal amounts," said lead researcher Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios.

Gut problems such as Crohn's disease could be helped, or even reversed, by eating lots of 'good' fats, such as from coconut oil and cocoa butter.

The fats change the bacteria in the gut—known as the microbiome—which reduces some of the distressing symptoms of Crohn's, such as swelling, cramping and diarrhea.

The fats reduce the types of bacteria that are linked to Crohn's by around 30 per cent, researchers from the Case Western Reserve University have discovered. Because the fats lower inflammation, they could have the same beneficial effects on other inflammatory bowel disorders too.

The good fats they tested are plant-based, rather than the saturated fats from animals, the researchers say.

"The finding is remarkable because it means that a Crohn's patient could have a beneficial effect on their gut bacteria and inflammation only by switching the type of fat in their diet. Patients would only need to replace a 'bad' fat with a 'good' fat, and eat normal amounts," said lead researcher Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios.

Gut problems such as Crohn's disease could be helped, or even reversed, by eating lots of 'good' fats, such as from coconut oil and cocoa butter.

The fats change the bacteria in the gut—known as the microbiome—which reduces some of the distressing symptoms of Crohn's, such as swelling, cramping and diarrhea.

The fats reduce the types of bacteria that are linked to Crohn's by around 30 per cent, researchers from the Case Western Reserve University have discovered. Because the fats lower inflammation, they could have the same beneficial effects on other inflammatory bowel disorders too.

The good fats they tested are plant-based, rather than the saturated fats from animals, the researchers say.

"The finding is remarkable because it means that a Crohn's patient could have a beneficial effect on their gut bacteria and inflammation only by switching the type of fat in their diet. Patients would only need to replace a 'bad' fat with a 'good' fat, and eat normal amounts," said lead researcher Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios.

Gut problems such as Crohn's disease could be helped, or even reversed, by eating lots of 'good' fats, such as from coconut oil and cocoa butter.

The fats change the bacteria in the gut—known as the microbiome—which reduces some of the distressing symptoms of Crohn's, such as swelling, cramping and diarrhea.

The fats reduce the types of bacteria that are linked to Crohn's by around 30 per cent, researchers from the Case Western Reserve University have discovered. Because the fats lower inflammation, they could have the same beneficial effects on other inflammatory bowel disorders too.

The good fats they tested are plant-based, rather than the saturated fats from animals, the researchers say.

"The finding is remarkable because it means that a Crohn's patient could have a beneficial effect on their gut bacteria and inflammation only by switching the type of fat in their diet. Patients would only need to replace a 'bad' fat with a 'good' fat, and eat normal amounts," said lead researcher Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios.

Gut problems such as Crohn's disease could be helped, or even reversed, by eating lots of 'good' fats, such as from coconut oil and cocoa butter.

The fats change the bacteria in the gut—known as the microbiome—which reduces some of the distressing symptoms of Crohn's, such as swelling, cramping and diarrhea.

The fats reduce the types of bacteria that are linked to Crohn's by around 30 per cent, researchers from the Case Western Reserve University have discovered. Because the fats lower inflammation, they could have the same beneficial effects on other inflammatory bowel disorders too.

The good fats they tested are plant-based, rather than the saturated fats from animals, the researchers say.

"The finding is remarkable because it means that a Crohn's patient could have a beneficial effect on their gut bacteria and inflammation only by switching the type of fat in their diet. Patients would only need to replace a 'bad' fat with a 'good' fat, and eat normal amounts," said lead researcher Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios.
http://www.metro.us/things-to-do/

Leave your comment below.

Gut problems such as Crohn's disease could be helped, or even reversed, by eating lots of 'good' fats, such as from coconut oil and cocoa butter.

The fats change the bacteria in the gut—known as the microbiome—which reduces some of the distressing symptoms of Crohn's, such as swelling, cramping and diarrhea.

The fats reduce the types of bacteria that are linked to Crohn's by around 30 per cent, researchers from the Case Western Reserve University have discovered. Because the fats lower inflammation, they could have the same beneficial effects on other inflammatory bowel disorders too.

The good fats they tested are plant-based, rather than the saturated fats from animals, the researchers say.

"The finding is remarkable because it means that a Crohn's patient could have a beneficial effect on their gut bacteria and inflammation only by switching the type of fat in their diet. Patients would only need to replace a 'bad' fat with a 'good' fat, and eat normal amounts," said lead researcher Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios.

Gut problems such as Crohn's disease could be helped, or even reversed, by eating lots of 'good' fats, such as from coconut oil and cocoa butter.

The fats change the bacteria in the gut—known as the microbiome—which reduces some of the distressing symptoms of Crohn's, such as swelling, cramping and diarrhea.

The fats reduce the types of bacteria that are linked to Crohn's by around 30 per cent, researchers from the Case Western Reserve University have discovered. Because the fats lower inflammation, they could have the same beneficial effects on other inflammatory bowel disorders too.

The good fats they tested are plant-based, rather than the saturated fats from animals, the researchers say.
Brooklyn has a home-grown sport that’s made it all the way to China and Australia, but hasn’t really become a movement here.
Best known as extreme calisthenics or street workout, neither of those terms does it justice. Think more like breakdancing in the air, somewhere between parkour and Cirque du Soleil.
Men and women use only their body weight and the makeshift uneven bars they find on public jungle gyms, turning their workouts into tests of balance, agility and stamina. Oh, you can do a plank? Try doing it hanging backwards from a bar.
The sport took off thanks to Instagram and YouTube, where stars like Brandon “Beastmode” CorreaSimone “Mingja” MingStephen “Brooklyn Tank” Navaretta and Gina Scarangella have inspired people all over the globe from Europe to Brazil, Australia to China. It’s even been broadcast on EuroSport as “street workout.”
Starting next year, they’ll be organized under the banner of the Urban Fitness League, founded by Ben Sturner, president of the sports startup incubator Leverage Agency.
“I found out about UFL by walking down Union Square and watching this guy doing crazy pull-ups and muscle-ups,” Sturner recalls. “I asked his name; he said it was Abs, and he pulled up his shirt — he had a 16-pack.”
Sturner hired him as his trainer, and this July 4 he’s bringing the first major public exhibition of future UFL athletes to Coney Island. Hosted by Mario Lopez and Tyson Beckford, the exhibition at Ford Amphitheater will feature some of the biggest names in the sport from around the world performing freestyle routines and battles with a halftime show by DJ Envy, Jim Jones, Juelz Santana and more. Tickets start at $10.
“We’re the antithesis of the Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest,” Sturner says, nodding to the usual main event in Coney Island for the Fourth. “In the U.S., there hasn’t been a big organized event like this — this is the Super Bowl of the sport.”
The event, like the sport, will be family oriented. Inclusivity is a cornerstone of the sport, since the only thing you need is your body and a kid-free playground, and athletes will include a performer without legs, a 16-year-old girl and a man who’s 74. “It’s a great thing for families to come to because it’ll be very motivational,” he says. “They’re going to want to come home and try this.”
Sturner is already lining up the starpower behind Urban Fitness League, which will be organized into teams led by sports icons like Red Sox star David Ortiz in Boston and NBA All-Star point guard Stephon Marbury in China. Marbury will also be at Coney Island this weekend, giving out 1,000 pairs of shoes and signing autographs for fans.
Sturner’s vision for the league is to be a “convergence of sport, style and music,” with all the trappings of other professional sports like a draft, and a reality series. But it all starts in Coney Island, so check out the action on the Fourth of July.
"The finding is remarkable because it means that a Crohn's patient could have a beneficial effect on their gut bacteria and inflammation only by switching the type of fat in their diet. Patients would only need to replace a 'bad' fat with a 'good' fat, and eat normal amounts," said lead researcher Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios.


Gut problems such as Crohn's disease could be helped, or even reversed, by eating lots of 'good' fats, such as from coconut oil and cocoa butter.

The fats change the bacteria in the gut—known as the microbiome—which reduces some of the distressing symptoms of Crohn's, such as swelling, cramping and diarrhea.

The fats reduce the types of bacteria that are linked to Crohn's by around 30 per cent, researchers from the Case Western Reserve University have discovered. Because the fats lower inflammation, they could have the same beneficial effects on other inflammatory bowel disorders too.

The good fats they tested are plant-based, rather than the saturated fats from animals, the researchers say.

"The finding is remarkable because it means that a Crohn's patient could have a beneficial effect on their gut bacteria and inflammation only by switching the type of fat in their diet. Patients would only need to replace a 'bad' fat with a 'good' fat, and eat normal amounts," said lead researcher Alexander Rodriguez-Palacios.
Click Here For More Articles